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Eye of Horus Rethought

The Eye of Horus is a powerful Egyptian symbol that is thought to offer protection. This is a modernization of a design straight from ancient Egypt.

  • by Campbell@Manchester
    As Queen Elizabeth II marks an historic 70 years on the British throne, it seems timely to reflect on what is known about Pharaonic attitudes to such regnal milestones. Although the term ‘heb-sed’ (or ‘sed-festival’) is often translated as ‘jubilee’ … Continue reading →
  • by Campbell@Manchester
    Originally posted on hello future: To mark Mental Health Awareness Week this guest post from Campbell Price, Curator of Egypt and Sudan, offers some personal reflections of getting the collections ready for the ‘To Have and To Heal’ project. To…
  • by Campbell@Manchester
    Despite the loss of the head of this figure, its identity is easily discernible as Osiris, the god of rebirth and regeneration. Unlike the other commonly shrouded gods like Ptah and Khonsu, the arm positions indicate the figure was intended … Continue reading →
  • by Campbell@Manchester
    A guest post from palettologist and independent researcher Matt Szafran on an intriguing item that may not be all it at first appears… Predynastic Egyptian palettes were rediscovered in late 19th and early 20th century excavations. Archaeologists in the 19th … Continue reading →
  • by Campbell@Manchester
    One of Manchester Museum’s most intriguing sets of objects derives from an unusual context – or contexts – known as the ‘Ramesseum Tomb’. Commonly known by the name of the much later ‘Temple of Millions of Years’ of Ramesses II … Continue reading →
  • by Campbell@Manchester
    As part of a continuing series of explorations of the colonial history of Egypt and Sudan, Phoebe Aldridge writes a guest post on a little-known aspect of the modern history of Sudan, the complexities of British rule, and the collecting … Continue reading →
  • by Campbell@Manchester
    A guest post by University of Manchester museology student Molly Osbourne, describing a virtual placement working on a little-known aspect of the Egyptology collection. The first thing I want to point out about this placement is that due to the … Continue reading →
  • by Campbell@Manchester
    Another post from guest blogger and Predynastic specialist Matt Szafran – on one of Manchester Museum’s most iconic objects. The so-called ‘hippo bowl’ (accessioned as no. 5069) is undoubtedly a beautiful and unique object, as can be seen from its … Continue reading →
  • by Campbell@Manchester
    Although among the rather less prepossessing artefacts in the Manchester collection, this crudely carved wooden figurine holds significant interest. Often called a ‘stick shabti’, the figurine may in fact not really be a shabti – in the conventional Egyptological sense … Continue reading →
  • by Campbell@Manchester
    William Matthew Flinders Petrie (1853-1942) took a particular interest in the human face. A significant number of important finds from three seasons of excavations he directed at the site of Hawara were exported to Britain and acquired by Manchester Museum. … Continue reading →

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