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Consumed By Abyss

Sometime the burdens of life creep over you, consuming what little joy you had left.

  • by Kuyken, W., Ball, S., Crane, C., Ganguli, P., Jones, B., Montero-Marin, J., Nuthall, E., Raja, A., Taylor, L., Tudor, K., Viner, R. M., Allwood, M., Aukland, L., Dunning, D., Casey, T., Dalrymple, N., De Wilde, K., Farley, E.-R., Harper, J., Hinze, V., Kappelmann, N., Kempnich, M., Lord, L., Medlicott, E., Palmer, L., Petit, A., Philips, A., Pryor-Nitsch, I., Radley, L., Sonley, A., Shackleford, J., Tickell, A., Team, M., Blakemore, S.-J., Ukoumunne, O. C., Greenberg, M. T., Ford, T., Dalgleish, T., Byford, S., Williams, J. M. G.
    Background Education is broader than academic teaching. It includes teaching students social–emotional skills both directly and indirectly through a positive school climate. Objective To evaluate if a universal school-based mindfulness training (SBMT) enhances teacher mental health and school climate. Methods The My Resilience in Adolescence parallel group, cluster randomised controlled trial (registration: ISRCTN86619085; funding: Wellcome Trust (WT104908/Z/14/Z, WT107496/Z/15/Z)) recruited 85 schools (679 teachers) delivering social and emotional teaching across the UK. Schools (clusters) were randomised 1:1 to either continue this provision (teaching as usual (TAU)) or include universal SBMT. Data on teacher mental health and school climate were collected at […]
  • by Dunning, D., Tudor, K., Radley, L., Dalrymple, N., Funk, J., Vainre, M., Ford, T., Montero-Marin, J., Kuyken, W., Dalgleish, T.
    Question Mindfulness-based programmes (MBPs) are an increasingly popular approach to improving mental health in young people. Our previous meta-analysis suggested that MBPs show promising effectiveness, but highlighted a lack of high-quality, adequately powered randomised controlled trials (RCTs). This updated meta-analysis assesses the-state-of the-art of MBPs for young people in light of new studies. It explores MBP’s effectiveness in active vs passive controls; selective versus universal interventions; and studies that included follow-up. Study selection and analysis We searched for published and unpublished RCTs of MBPs with young people (
  • by Montero-Marin, J., Allwood, M., Ball, S., Crane, C., De Wilde, K., Hinze, V., Jones, B., Lord, L., Nuthall, E., Raja, A., Taylor, L., Tudor, K., MYRIAD Team, Blakemore, S.-J., Byford, S., Dalgleish, T., Ford, T., Greenberg, M. T., Ukoumunne, O. C., Williams, J. M. G., Kuyken, W., Ahmed, Aukland, Bennett, Casey, Dalrymple, Farley, Fletcher, Foulkes, Griffiths, Griffin, Harper, Kappelmann, Kempnich, Komninidou, Knight, Laws, Leung, Medlicott, Palmer, Parker, Petit, Philips, Pi-Sunyer, Pryor-Nitsch, Radley, Shackleford, Sakhardande, Sellars, Sonley, Tickell, Vainre, Warriner, Wainman
    Background Preventing mental health problems in early adolescence is a priority. School-based mindfulness training (SBMT) is an approach with mixed evidence. Objectives To explore for whom SBMT does/does not work and what influences outcomes. Methods The My Resilience in Adolescence was a parallel-group, cluster randomised controlled trial (K=84 secondary schools; n=8376 students, age: 11–13) recruiting schools that provided standard social–emotional learning. Schools were randomised 1:1 to continue this provision (control/teaching as usual (TAU)), and/or to offer SBMT (‘.b’ (intervention)). Risk of depression, social–emotional–behavioural functioning and well-being were measured at baseline, preintervention, post intervention and 1 year follow-up. Hypothesised moderators, implementation […]
  • by Dunning, D., Ahmed, S., Foulkes, L., Griffin, C., Griffiths, K., Leung, J. T., Parker, J., Piera Pi-Sunyer, B., Sakhardande, A., Bennett, M., Haag, C., Montero-Marin, J., Packman, D., Vainre, M., Watson, P., The MYRIAD Team, Kuyken, W., Williams, J. M. G., Ukoumunne, O. C., Blakemore, S.-J., Dalgleish, T., The MYRIAD Team Group, Baer, Brett, Farley, Casey, Dalrymple, Wilde, Fletcher, Harper, Hinze, Kapplemann, Kempnich, Komnindou, Laws, Lord, Medlicott, Palmer, Petit, Phillips, Pryor-Nitsch, Radley, Raja, Sellars, Shackleford, Sonley, Taylor, Tickell, Warriner, Byford, Greenberg, Ford, Gathercole, Viner, Zelazo, Knight, Pi-Sunyer, Thomas, Ball, Ben Jones, Allen, Bogels, Cuijpers, Domitrovich, Frith, Moffitt, Patel
    Background Previous research suggests that mindfulness training (MT) appears effective at improving mental health in young people. MT is proposed to work through improving executive control in affectively laden contexts. However, it is unclear whether MT improves such control in young people. MT appears to mitigate mental health difficulties during periods of stress, but any mitigating effects against COVID-related difficulties remain unexamined. Objective To evaluate whether MT (intervention) versus psychoeducation (Psy-Ed; control), implemented in after-school classes: (1) Improves affective executive control; and/or (2) Mitigates negative mental health impacts from the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods A parallel randomised controlled trial (RCT) was […]
  • by Kuyken, W., Ball, S., Crane, C., Ganguli, P., Jones, B., Montero-Marin, J., Nuthall, E., Raja, A., Taylor, L., Tudor, K., Viner, R. M., Allwood, M., Aukland, L., Dunning, D., Casey, T., Dalrymple, N., De Wilde, K., Farley, E.-R., Harper, J., Kappelmann, N., Kempnich, M., Lord, L., Medlicott, E., Palmer, L., Petit, A., Philips, A., Pryor-Nitsch, I., Radley, L., Sonley, A., Shackleford, J., Tickell, A., Blakemore, S.-J., Team, T. M., Ukoumunne, O. C., Greenberg, M. T., Ford, T., Dalgleish, T., Byford, S., Williams, J. M. G.
    Background Systematic reviews suggest school-based mindfulness training (SBMT) shows promise in promoting student mental health. Objective The My Resilience in Adolescence (MYRIAD) Trial evaluated the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of SBMT compared with teaching-as-usual (TAU). Methods MYRIAD was a parallel group, cluster-randomised controlled trial. Eighty-five eligible schools consented and were randomised 1:1 to TAU (43 schools, 4232 students) or SBMT (42 schools, 4144 students), stratified by school size, quality, type, deprivation and region. Schools and students (mean (SD); age range=12.2 (0.6); 11–14 years) were broadly UK population-representative. Forty-three schools (n=3678 pupils; 86.9%) delivering SBMT, and 41 schools (n=3572; 86.2%) delivering TAU, […]
  • by Cuijpers, P.
    Universal school programmes aimed at the prevention of depression and other common mental health problems in adolescents are attractive because they are less stigmatising than targeted interventions, have a high uptake and may shift the ‘normal distribution’ of mental health problems in the positive direction. Research up to now shows small effects of these interventions, but even small effects may have a large impact because of the large number of people receiving these interventions. However, such small effects may also be related to the modest quality of the trials in this area. This means that current research has no clear […]
  • by Axford, N., Berry, V., Lloyd, J., Wyatt, K.
    Improving child and adolescent mental health requires the careful development and rigorous testing of interventions and delivery methods. This includes universal school-based mindfulness training, evaluated in the My Resilience in Adolescence (MYRIAD) trial reported in this special edition. While discovering effective interventions through randomised controlled trials is our ultimate aim, null or negative results can and should play an important role in progressing our understanding of what works. Unfortunately, alongside publication bias there can be a tendency to ignore, spin or unfairly undermine disappointing findings. This creates research waste that can increase risk and reduce benefits for future service users. […]

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